Centuries - A piano performance


Go to content

Main menu:


centuries




Centuries


Centuries is a performance for piano solo. The name comes from the second piece of the program and describes at the same time the mood of the whole program. One might imagine oneself as an eternal wanderer who is looking over the centuries from a point of overwiew. Then you can see time passing by. Sad things, pleasing things and deep changes happen in history and you are looking at all this from a distance and thinking about it.
I have found an eternal wanderer in a poem by Friedrich Rückert.


Chidher (written in 1824)

Chidher, the ever youthful, told:
I passed a city, bright to see;
A man was culling fruits of gold,
I asked him how old this town might be.
He answered, culling as before
"This town stood ever in days of yore,
And will stand on forevermore!"
Five hundred years from yonder day
I passed again the selfsame way,

And of the town I found no trace;
A shepherd blew on a reed instead;
His herd was grazing on the place.
"How long," I asked, "is the city dead?"
He answered, blowing as before
"The new crop grows the old one o'er,
This was my pasture evermore!"
Five hundred years from yonder day
I passed again the selfsame way.

A sea I found, the tide was full,
A sailor emptied nets with cheer;
And when he rested from his pull,
I asked how long that sea was here.
Then laughed he with a hearty roar
"As long as waves have washed this shore
They fished here ever in days of yore."
Five hundred years from yonder day
I passed again the selfsame way.

I found a forest settlement,
And o'er his axe, a tree to fell,
I saw a man in labor bent.
How old this wood I bade him tell.
"'Tis everlasting, long before
I lived it stood in days of yore,"
He quoth; "and shall grow evermore."
Five hundred years from yonder day
I passed again the selfsame way.

I saw a town; the market-square
Was swarming with a noisy throng.
"How long," I asked, "has this town been there?
Where are wood and sea and shepherd's song?"
They cried, nor heard among the roar
"This town was ever so before,
And so will live forevermore!"
"Five hundred years from yonder day
I want to pass the selfsame way."

Translation by : Margarete Münsterberg, from
The German Classics Masterpieces of German Literature

translated into English in twenty volumes, illustrated.Patrons' Edition 1914

Original version:


Chidher (geschrieben 1824)

Chidher, der ewig junge, sprach:
Ich fuhr an einer Stadt vorbei,
Ein Mann im Garten Früchte brach;
ich fragte, seit wann die Stadt hier sei?
Er sprach, und pflückte die Früchte fort:
Die Stadt steht ewig an diesem Ort,
Und wird so stehen ewig fort.
Und aber nach fünfhundert Jahren
Kam ich desselbigen Wegs gefahren.

Da fand ich keine Spur der Stadt;
Ein einsamer Schäfer blies die Schalmei,
Die Herde weidete Laub und Blatt;
Ich fragte: wie lang ist die Stadt vorbei?
Er sprach, und blies auf dem Rohre fort:
Das eine wächst, wenn das andre dorrt;
Das ist mein ewiger Weideort.
Und aber nach fünfhundert Jahren
Kam ich desselbigen Wegs gefahren.

Da fand ich ein Meer, das Wellen schlug,
Ein Schiffer warf die Netze frei,
Und als er ruhte vom schweren Zug,
Fragt ich, seit wann das Meer hier sei?
Er sprach, und lachte meinem Wort:
Solang als schäumen die Wellen dort,
Fischt man und fischt man in diesem Port.
Und aber nach fünfhundert Jahren
Kam ich desselbigen Wegs gefahren.

Da fand ich einen waldigen Raum,
Und einen Mann in der Siedelei,
Er fällte mit der Axt den Baum;
Ich fragte, wie alt der Wald hier sei?
Er sprach: der Wald ist ein ewiger Hort;
Schon ewig wohn ich an diesem Ort,
Und ewig wachsen die Bäum hier fort.
Und aber nach fünfhundert Jahren
Kam ich desselbigen Wegs gefahren.

Da fand ich eine Stadt, und laut
Erschallte der Markt vom Volksgeschrei.
Ich fragte: seit wann ist die Stadt erbaut?
Wohin ist Wald und Meer und Schalmei?
Sie schrien, und hörten nicht mein Wort:
So ging es ewig an diesem Ort,
Und wird so gehen ewig fort.
Und aber nach fünfhundert Jahren
Will ich desselbigen Weges fahren.

1914
http://www.bored.com/ebooks/World_Literature/german/german%20classics%20volume%205.html


Back to content | Back to main menu